KATE CARPENTER

writes

Archive for the ‘books’ Category

One month down

This is my view today, almost one month into 2013. The flowers were my reward for reaching my latest writing goal, and behind them you can see a few pages from a draft that I’ve been revising. Today, everything feels slow–the words come slowly, it takes extra-long for the teapot to whistle, I plod from […]

The first step is admitting you have a problem

My name is Kate Carpenter, and I have a book-buying addiction. This weekend, in the course of a 36-hour trip to St. Louis, I managed to visit a bookstore 3 times and buy a new book each time (36 hours!). The bookshelf we built this summer is already overflowing with all the new books I’ve […]

Self-publishing

I’m mired in editing one project and brainstorming for another, but I thought I would step away from that today to talk about self-publishing. Between the media frenzy over the latest self-published surprise bestseller and the ever-increasing number of “how to market your self-published novel” articles in my favorite writing magazines, I find myself reflecting […]

Lauren Oliver in Kansas City

I’m discovering that one of the major bonuses of living in a big city is that cool things happen here. Musicians, artists and especially authors that I used to just read about come right here, to the city where I live, all the time. One of our local bookstores, Rainy Day Books, hosts a plethora […]

Recent Reads

Recently, I’ve been tackling some middle grade historical fiction, a genre I have always enjoyed but never read enough of. A few weeks ago, I finished Moon Over Manifest, by Clare Vanderpool, which was a thoroughly enjoyable read, and this week I wrapped up The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate, by Jacqueline Kelly. Calpurnia Tate is […]

Re-learning

In returning to writing, one of my first projects has been trying to unlearn some of the training that my years in journalism school and in newspapers pounded into my head. I’ve spent so much time giving priority to the sparse sentence and to the complete absence of unnecessary description (not to mention the limited […]